3d6 Revisited

After a few sessions (has it been two months already?) using 3d6 instead of d20, I've come up with a few revisions and clarifications of the original rules. These are designed to increase the fun; the balance has to be accounted for elsewhere.

1,1,1: automatic miss.
  • If the power has the keyword "weapon" or "implement" you drop the appropriate item;
  • If not (or if not possible) you fall prone.
1,1,2 / 1,1,3 / 1,2,2: automatic miss.
2,2,2: roll 1d2 and add that to the attack
3,3,3: roll 1d3 and add that to the attack
4,4,4: roll 1d4 and add that to the attack
5,5,5: roll 1d5 and add that to the attack
4,6,6 / 5,5,6: automatic hit.
  • If the attack would have hit anyway, replace [W] rolls with their maximum (crit).
5,6,6: automatic hit.
  • If the attack would have hit anyway, add maximum [W] damage (high crit).
    • If high crit weapon, add it again.
6,6,6: automatic hit.
  • If the power deals damage, add maximum [W] damage (high crit).
    • If the attack would have hit anyway, add it again
      • If high crit weapon, add it again.
  • If not: use the effect progression *

* The "effect progression" is designed so you don't feel let down when see you that glorious: ⚅⚅⚅ but don't have anything to maximise. It came up when our first triple-six was the wizard casting his (non-damaging) "sleep" spell (the houserule there is: the targets automatically fail the first save, and if I'm feeling generous they don't get the one round of slowedness first.) Since then I've come up with a basic guide to letting everyone enjoy the potency of that 1-in-216 chance.

For "negative" effects my progression is:

pushed/pulled/slid prone dazed stunned unconscious ¿ 1d4 damage ?
slowed immobilised

Of course, if it's obvious that a particular immobilising action should progress to restrained, for example, that's perfectly alright too. Not to mention blinded, deafened, dominated, weakened, etc.

The "positive" progression is a bit trickier, because there are basically the three parallel progressions:

cover superior cover insubstantial
lightly obscured heavily obscured totally obscured
concealment total concealment invisible

... But at any point it could be totally reasonable for one branch to lead into another, or somewhere else. Those ones I just play by ear.

The overall goal with these progressions is that I want to make my players feel like they succeeded so well (or their spell was so potent) that the effect is the same, but turned up to 11.

... Matty /<


Matthew Kerwin

Published
Modified
License
CC BY-SA 4.0
Tags
d&d, houserules, rpg

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